Best Indoor IP Camera – 2020 Recommendations

I believe a DIY home security camera system is not complete unless it has indoor cameras. Outdoor cameras are great for securing your home’s perimeter and alerting you to an intrusion, but what if the intruder has entered your home?

That’s why you need smartly placed indoor IP cameras to hopefully capture identifying features of the intruder so that law enforcement can take them down!

BUDGET PICK
Amcrest IP2M-841B
2MP sensor
Wi-Fi or PoE available
Pan-Tilt

BEST OVERALL
Reolink C2 Pro
4MP sensor
Wi-Fi, Ethernet
Pan-Tilt-Zoom

BEST PREMIUM
Hikvision Cube
4MP sensor
Wi-Fi, PoE
Advanced motion detection

At the end of this article, you will also find my recommendations for specific purposes and thoughts on the other popular IP cameras and why they didn’t make the cut.

Best Indoor IP Cameras – 2020 Recommendations

As always, I have divided this post into two sections – indoor IP cameras I recommend and the ones that didn’t make the cut. You will find different types of indoor IP cameras on this list: cube cameras, dome cameras and Pan-Tilt-Zoom (PTZ). Cube cameras and dome cameras may either have a fixed lens (no zoom and you cannot move the camera view remotely) or be able to Pan-Tilt (PT).

Every IP camera I recommend meets the must-have features described at the end of this article (basically not cloud-reliant, not Internet-reliant and no monthly fees). I will explain why the other IP cameras don’t meet my minimum requirements even though they may seem to be popular online.

Amcrest ProHD 2MP PT PoE (IP2M-841EB) & Wi-Fi (IP2M-841B) Camera

Features

  • 2MP CMOS image sensor
  • 90° Viewing Angle, Pan-Tilt
  • 10m IR range
  • Built-in mic and speaker, half-duplex
  • Ethernet port, Wi-Fi
  • SD card slot
  • ONVIF and RTSP protocols supported
  • Audio and alarm in/outs

PROS:
  • Good image quality
  • Great viewing angle with Pan-Tilt
  • Very clear and loud two-way audio
  • Both WiFi and Ethernet port, so can use PoE injector
  • IR LEDs provide night vision capability
  • Built-in NVR feature with SD card
  • Home Automation compatible with ONVIF, RTSP, alarm in/out
  • Insane value for money

CONS:
  • Audio is half-duplex only, works like a walkie-talkie
  • No PoE feature available

Amcrest was one of the earliest brands I featured on my roundups along with Hikvision and Dahua. While Foscam made some very popular cameras, they had several shortcomings and I was never really satisfied with their cameras. Then Amcrest spun off from Foscam and totally disrupted the market with their reasonably priced and well-made cameras such as this Amcrest ProHD 1080p Pan-Tilt WiFi Camera (IP2M-841B). Amcrest has this unique blend of high-quality hardware, reliable software, and great after-sales support that makes it easy to recommend any of their products.

This camera has an Ethernet port, WiFi, built-in InfraRed LEDs for very good night vision, clear 2-way audio with mic and speaker, built-in SD card local storage, and on top of all this, very good low-light performance. In our detailed hands-on review, I wrote about how I can even see our little one’s chest rising and falling as he breathes. The video is that clear. One downside is that the pan-tilt motion is not super quiet.

Amcrest has smartphone apps for both iOS and Android. 4 hours of free cloud storage comes free with every Amcrest camera, with more storage available on the purchase of a subscription. The camera does not need an Internet connection to be set up or for functioning normally. So it can work in a fully standalone manner.

Even though there is an Ethernet port, the Wi-Fi model doesn’t support Power-over-Ethernet (PoE). But there is a PoE model available without Wi-Fi: Amcrest ProHD IP2M-841EB.

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Reolink C2 Pro PT Wired/Wi-Fi Camera

Features

  • 4MP CMOS image sensor
  • 48-92° Viewing Angle, Pan-Tilt-Zoom
  • 10m IR range
  • Built-in mic and speaker, full-duplex
  • Ethernet port, Wi-Fi
  • SD card slot
  • ONVIF and RTSP protocols supported

PROS:
  • Easy setup through mobile app
  • Very good image and audio quality
  • Very quiet and smooth Pan-Tilt-Zoom motion
  • Full duplex 2-way audio
  • Built-in NVR feature
  • Dual band Wi-Fi
  • Support for ONVIF & RTSP
  • On-board microSD storage, pre-record and post-record feature
  • Alarm buzzer feature

CONS:
  • No Power over Ethernet
  • Slight lag in audio
  • Pan-Tilt speed cannot be adjusted
  • No audio or alarm connections

Reolink is a very DIY-friendly security camera company. In fact they are my favourites for affordable no-nonsense well-built cameras. In past years, the Reolink C1 Pro regularly featured in our round-up. However it did not have zoom, so the C2 Pro is the one to go for if you need zoom.

All non-battery-powered Reolink cameras support the ONVIF standard. This lets you use them with any 3rd party NVR, NAS NVR or software such as Blueiris which supports the ONVIF standard. The RTSP video streaming protocol is also supported, so I have integrated the camera with my Vera Plus home automation system.

The C2 Pro has a video sensor with 4MP resolution, which by the way is not unusual for an indoor camera anymore. The higher pixel count however leads to a maximum viewing angle of 92° which is great for a 4MP camera. Together with the super silent PTZ feature, this is a very capable indoor camera. The PTZ motors need to be super quiet if like me you use this in your baby’s nursery.

One standout feature of the C2 Pro is 2-way full-duplex audio on top of its built-in mic and speaker. However there is a noticeable lag which affects the ease with which you can carry on a 2-way conversation through the camera.

Reolink has very highly regarded smartphone apps for both iOS and Android.

Check out my full review of the C2 Pro below:

8.5
Review: Reolink C2 Pro 5MP Wireless Indoor PTZ IP Camera

Review: Reolink C2 Pro 5MP Wireless Indoor PTZ IP Camera

While there are many pan-tilt indoor security cameras on the market, there has been a distinct lack of reliable yet ...

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Amcrest ProHD 4MP PT Wired/Wi-Fi Camera (IP4M-1051B)

Features

  • 4MP CMOS image sensor
  • 120° Viewing Angle, Pan-Tilt
  • 10m IR range
  • Built-in mic and speaker, half-duplex
  • Audio in/out ports
  • Ethernet port, Dual-band Wi-Fi
  • Up to 128GB SD card supported
  • ONVIF and RTSP protocols supported

PROS:
  • Great good image and audio quality
  • Built-in NVR feature
  • Dual band Wi-Fi
  • Both WiFi and Ethernet port, so can use PoE injector
  • Home Automation compatible with ONVIF, RTSP
  • Works with any NVR also
  • On-board microSD storage, pre-record and post-record feature

CONS:
  • No Power over Ethernet
  • Pan-Tilt speed cannot be adjusted
  • No alarm connections
  • Half-duplex 2-way audio


The Amcrest IP4M-1051B is a stylish 4MP indoor IP camera that works with Amazon Alexa also. It can pan and tilt, but not zoom. The fixed lens has a very wide angle of 120°. Wi-Fi can be tricky in the furthest corners of your home, so this camera supports both 2.3 and 5.0 GHz bands. For the bitrates that such cameras typically use, 2.4GHz is more than enough and gives you maximum range.

Even though there is an Ethernet port, this Wi-Fi model doesn’t support Power-over-Ethernet (PoE). There is no PoE model available, but you can use a PoE injector.

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Reolink E1 Pro PT Wi-Fi Camera

Features

  • 4MP CMOS image sensor
  • 87.5° Viewing Angle, Pan-Tilt
  • 12m IR range
  • Built-in mic and speaker, full-duplex
  • Wi-Fi (2.4/5GHz) only
  • microSD card slot
  • ONVIF and RTSP protocols supported

PROS:
  • Easy voice guided setup through mobile app
  • Great image and audio quality
  • Very quiet and smooth Pan-Tilt motion
  • Full duplex 2-way audio
  • Dual-band Wi-Fi
  • Support for ONVIF & RTSP
  • On-board microSD storage, pre-record and post-record feature
  • Built-in NVR feature
  • Siren alarm feature

CONS:
  • No Power over Ethernet
  • Slight lag in audio
  • Pan-Tilt speed cannot be adjusted
  • No audio or alarm connections

The Reolink E1 series of indoor IP cameras is noticeably smaller than the C2 Pro model. So it blends into the background much better and can easily go unnoticed on a bookshelf. The tennis-ball shaped body fully encases the eye-ball style lens. While the E1 Pro loses a web admin page, you can configure it through the Reolink mobile app and more fully through the Reolink CLient PC app.

Check out my full review of the C2 Pro below:

8.3
Review: Reolink E1 Pro 4MP Wireless Indoor Pan-Tilt Security Camera

Review: Reolink E1 Pro 4MP Wireless Indoor Pan-Tilt Security Camera

Two years ago we reviewed the Reolink C1 Pro, a 4 Megapixel wireless pan-tilt indoor security camera. We loved it so ...

If you would like an optical zoom function too, check out the Reolink E1 Zoom model.

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Amcrest ProHD 3MP PT Wi-Fi Camera (IP3M-941B)

Features

  • 3MP CMOS image sensor
  • 90° Viewing Angle, Pan-Tilt
  • 10m IR range
  • Built-in mic and speaker, half-duplex
  • Ethernet port, Wi-Fi
  • Audio and alarm in/out
  • SD card slot
  • ONVIF and RTSP protocols supported

PROS:
  • Good image quality
  • 90 degree viewing angle, with Pan-Tilt
  • Very clear and loud two-way audio with mic and speaker built-in
  • WiFi and RJ-45 Ethernet port, so can use a PoE injector
  • IR LEDs provide night vision capability
  • Built-in NVR feature, support for SD card, NAS, NVR, FTP and Cloud storage locations
  • Home Automation compatible with ONVIF and RTSP support, works with any NVR also
  • Audio and alarm in/out connections
  • Great value for money

CONS:
  • Audio is half-duplex only, you cannot hear and speak simultaneously
  • Still no model with both PoE and Wi-Fi, unlike Hikvision

This is the 3MP version of the IP2M-841B mentioned earlier. The resolution is bumped up to 2304×1296 at 20 fps. Otherwise its similar to the 2MP model.

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Hikvision DS-2CD2442FWD-IW PoE & Wi-Fi Camera

Features

  • 4MP CMOS image sensor, 120 dB WDR
  • 105.8° viewing angle
  • 10m IR range, PIR sensor
  • Built-in mic and speaker, half-duplex
  • Ethernet port, Wi-Fi
  • Audio and alarm in/out
  • microSD card slot
  • ONVIF and RTSP protocols supported
  • 12VDC & POE(802.3af)

PROS:
  • Great image quality with true WDR
  • WiFi and RJ-45 Ethernet port with PoE
  • Advanced motion detection
  • PIR sensor for accurate motion detection
  • Built-in NVR feature
  • Home Automation compatible with ONVIF and RTSP support, works with any NVR also
  • Audio and alarm in/out connections
  • Great value for money

CONS:
  • Audio is half-duplex only, you cannot hear and speak simultaneously

Hikvision is well-known in DIY circles for being the original choice for CCTV enthusiasts. This is mainly because you find premium features like advanced motion detection to reduce false alerts. The original 3MP cube camera was a super hit, and now they have 4MP, 5MP and 6MP versions to choose from.

The DS-2CD2442FWD-IW has a trick up its sleeve to prevent false motion alerts – a PIR sensor. Use this instead of the software motion detection to drastically reduce the number of false motion alerts you will get.

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Samsung SmartCam SNH-V6410PN PT Wi-Fi Camera

Features

  • 2MP 1080p CMOS image sensor
  • 80.9° Viewing Angle, Pan-Tilt
  • 5m IR range
  • Built-in mic and speaker, half-duplex
  • Wi-Fi only
  • SD card slot
  • RTSP protocols supported

PROS:
  • Pan-Tilt with automatic object tracking feature makes it a great surveillance camera
  • Supports audio-triggered alerts
  • Unique auto object tracking feature works well
  • Home Automation compatible with RTSP support

CONS:
  • No Ethernet port
  • Only 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi, 5GHz not supported
  • Auto object tracking disabled when motion zones are defined
  • ONVIF not supported
  • Half-duplex audio
  • No audio or alarm connections

The cryptically named Samsung SmartCam SNH-V6410PN finds a place once again in my list of the best indoor IP cameras. The main reason for this is the super cool auto-tracking feature that no other cube camera has. When motion detection is set to on, the camera will use its motorized pan-tilt feature to detect and follow a moving object or person around the room. The only downside is that it works only if you have NOT defined your own motion detection zones.

Strangely there is no RJ-45 port, so Power over Ethernet (PoE) is missing. Even if a camera doesn’t support PoE, an Ethernet port lets you power it via a PoE injector but this is not an option with the Smartcam. Also the WiFi is only of the 2.4GHz variety, so be gentle with the bitrate setting if you use the maximum 1080p resolution option. I personally do not use 5GHz at home as my fibre broadband tops out at 76Mbps which is absolutely within reach of 2.4GHz 802.11n speeds throughout the house. The 5GHz band is likely to be less crowded though.

The Smartcam has night vision with Infrared LEDs and a true IR cut filter, but the range is on the lower side with just 5 metres being claimed. But this should be sufficient for all but the longest of rooms. Anyway most cheap cameras that claim 10-15 metres range are bluffing in my opinion. While ONVIF is not supported (you can’t chuck this camera into just any NVR), RTSP is. So you can pull up the camera stream from apps like tinyCam Monitor/IP Camera Monitor, or a home automation system such as my Vera Plus (read review).

Samsung Smartcam has apps for both iOS and Android.

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Vivotek FD9181 Zoom Wi-Fi Camera

Features

  • 5MP 1080p CMOS image sensor
  • 45-93° Viewing Angle
  • 30m IR range
  • Built-in mic and speaker, full-duplex with echo cancellation
  • Ethernet port with PoE
  • SD card slot
  • ONVIF and RTSP protocols supported

PROS:
  • Excellent good image and audio quality
  • Full duplex 2-way audio, built-in mic and audio in/out
  • Built-in NVR feature
  • Support for ONVIF & RTSP
  • PIR sensor to minimise false alerts
  • On-board microSD storage, pre-record and post-record feature

CONS:
  • No Pan-Tilt feature
  • No on-board speaker
  • No alarm connections


Indoor IP cameras are also available in the dome variety. The Vivotek FD9181 is a high-end 5 Megapixel PoE dome with a 3-10mm varifocal lens. It supports full-duplex audio, built-in microphone, and has both audio and alarm in/out connections. Interestingly it also has a PIR sensor which can give you more accurate motion detection than just software-based detection that non-PIR equipped cameras provide. True hardware WDR and an SD card slot round off the features list.

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Vivotek IP8160 (PoE) & Vivotek IP8160-W (Wi-Fi) PT Camera

Features

  • 2MP 1080p CMOS image sensor
  • 113° Viewing Angle, Pan-Tilt
  • 8m IR range
  • Built-in mic and speaker, full-duplex with echo cancellation
  • Ethernet port, PoE or Wi-Fi models
  • SD card slot
  • ONVIF and RTSP protocols supported

PROS:
  • Very good image and audio quality
  • Full duplex 2-way audio
  • Built-in NVR feature
  • Dual band Wi-Fi
  • Support for ONVIF & RTSP
  • On-board microSD storage, pre-record and post-record feature

CONS:
  • No Pan-Tilt
  • No audio or alarm connections


I am always on the look-out for full-featured cameras that support PoE. The Vivotek IP8160 is such a camera. It comes in two models – the IP8160 which is PoE and IP8160-W which supports Wi-Fi only. However the IP8160-W does have an Ethernet port, so you can always use a PoE injector to carry both data and power over a single Ethernet cable.

But the real story here is the full-duplex audio support with Acoustic Echo Cancellation. This ensures natural bi-directional audio without the annoying echoes and lag that lesser cameras suffer from. The IP8160 is also the only indoor cube camera I have found which supports true Wide Dynamic Range (WDR) for enhanced images in difficult lighting conditions. The WDR really helps when your camera has a window in the scene and the sun shines right through, a non-WDR camera would be blinded but a WDR camera like the Vivotek will still eke out detail and give a usable video.

The camera has a nice wide-angle lens with 113° coverage, and local storage in the form of an SD card slot. It would have been nice to see audio and alarm connections and even a PIR sensor.

Vivotek has the iViewer smartphone app for both iOS and Android.

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The ones that didn’t make the cut

A couple of years ago, most camera manufacturers figured out that a better way of making money is to sell you cameras that are crippled and become expensive paperweights unless you hook them up to the Internet and (in most cases) pay a hefty monthly subscription – all for the luxury of using your security camera that you already paid for. I am an engineer and one thing that I learnt pretty early on is that you always have to look at the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) when comparing any two products. You would be just wasting your money if you bought an ultra cheap product which then needs a monthly investment to keep working for the rest of its life.

The same TCO concept applies when you buy a camera. The TCO of cloud cameras which requires a monthly subscription is very high compared to a self-sufficient camera which has a one-time cost.

Nest Cam: It was and probably still is the most over-rated security camera ever. Even with the new IQ model, this is a very poor security camera. First off, it cannot work without an Internet connection, it has no local storage so it can only record to the Google cloud, and what’s worse it stores only 3 hours of footage unless you pay up for the Nest Aware cloud subscription ($10/mo per camera at the moment, discount available for additional cameras).

Instead of pushing out gimmicks such as person detection and face identification, they should make the camera 100% reliable by giving it at least a local backup storage location like the Netgear Arlo Q does, making it less Internet-reliant.

Logitech Circle and Circle 2: Last year, Logitech launched the Circle which was an overpriced attempt at competing with the Netgear Arlo and Nest Cam. Now they have launched the Logitech Circle 2 which is an outdoor camera in both wired and wire-free flavours. Regardless of whether its the original Circle or the new Circle 2, both lack a local storage option and are reliant on an Internet connection to the Logitech cloud servers. If you don’t pay for the monthly subscription, you have access to the last 24 hours recorded footage but no motion zones and advanced alerts.
Canary All-in-One Home Security: I am not a big fan of all in one security devices, mainly because they are full of compromises made to still keep the device within a reasonable price point. The Canary is one of many such I-can-do-it-all devices in the market today. Not only does it do home security, it does home health as well with sensors to monitor air quality. Now if I could do something useful with this sort of information locally such as turn on my dehumidifier or air filter, I would have been mildly interested. It may be possible through IFTTT but again this is Internet-reliant. Sadly, this device is also 100% cloud-reliant. I do not want to be locked into any single manufacturer’s eco-system and then end up paying a cloud subscription fee, but that’s the case with Canary! So in short, the Canary is crippled if the cloud servers decide to take a hike – not great when it comes to protecting your family.
Piper NV All-in-One Home Security: Piper burst onto the all in one security device market with a bold promise – no monthly fees. Yet it is 100% reliant on the cloud because it has no local storage options. There is no SD card or USB drive option available with the Piper NV. But it strangely has some elements of a DIY home automation system, it’s a ZWave hub as well. So its less locked-in and proprietary than others of its ilk. But don’t be deceived, this device is designed to be reliant on the Piper cloud servers: it still can do only 100 recorded clips of up to 35 seconds each before you are asked to start paying a monthly subscription fee.

That’s not a whole lot especially if for some reason you get a lot of false alerts. Its very interesting that while the Piper NV has battery backup in case of power loss, it has absolutely nothing to protect it from an Internet outage or if their cloud servers go down. What would happen in such a situation? A burglar breaks in, the Piper motion detection is activated, but your Internet connection is disabled or the cloud servers are unavailable and the Piper cant record its video clips! Great for the burglar, not so great for you. Bummer.

Granted, companies like Piper are bringing innovation to the home security market, but if they expect us to trust them 100% for our home security, the products need to be as close to 100% reliable as possible. This blog is hosted on a VPS that has a Service Level Agreement that promise a 99.9% up-time for example. My point is no cloud server has a 100% up-time, so what happens when the inevitable service disruption happens? Well folks, don’t rely on anybody’s cloud. Build your own local DIY home security system like I have!

Zmodo Sight: Last year I commended the Zmodo Pivot for having local storage in the form of 16GB onboard memory and not being cloud-reliant. While this is still the case, Zmodo is going the way of all the other cloud-reliant camera makers and appears to not let you view continuous video recordings or alert clips more than 12 hours old, unless you pay the monthly cloud subscription fee. No thanks.
Yi Cam: The Yi camera is possibly the cheapest IP camera you can get these days. Being nearly half the price of the cheapest mainstream brands sets off alarm bells for me right away. Yes being a Chinese brand, designed and owned by a Chinese company (Xiaoyi) does help keep costs down but surely there must be some trade-offs?

Yep, there’s no such thing as a free lunch. The Yi family of cameras work only with their smartphone apps and are 100% reliant on the cloud servers, these cameras don’t even have a web interface for you to use locally! Moreover, the company has been severely criticized by its users for its draconian terms and conditions of use. My recommendation – steer well clear of this and other unheard of Chinese brands.

Amazon Cloudcam: Amazon’s effort to integrate even more into your life (not just shopping), the Cloudcam naturally requires an internet connection and a connection to the Amazon cloud to function. Not fit for home security then.
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What to look for in an indoor IP camera

The most important must-have features to look for in an indoor security camera are:

  • Video Resolution – In 2020, 720p cameras are just not acceptable. They simply don’t have the resolution to meet the very high threshold that the police and courts require to achieve a conviction. Unless the intruder’s face is right up against the camera, 720p is just not going to capture enough detail to identify a person, especially in the dark. So, my minimum recommendation remains 1080p Full HD (or 2 Megapixels).
  • Field of view or horizontal viewing angle – This depends on the focal length of the camera lens. The wider the horizontal viewing angle, the more flexible the camera is going to be for placement in a tricky place such as a wide living room. Some manufacturers quote the diagonal angle which can be misleading as its always going to be higher than the horizontal one – like how TV screens are marketed! All viewing angles in this article are horizontal values.
  • Night vision – InfraRed night vision is crucial for getting good quality night shots. A true IR cut filter helps to produce true colour images during the day and high quality images at night. EXIR LEDs are brighter and have longer lifespans than the typical IR LEDs used in cheaper cameras.
  • Audio – Most indoor cameras have a built-in microphone, this is great for recording incriminating evidence. It should also have a built-in speaker.
  • Should not be Cloud-reliant – I feel very strongly about privacy and being in control of my data. The trend in recent years has been to create ‘cloud’ cameras that are reliant on the manufacturer’s cloud servers to do even basic things such as motion detection and event recording. Why? Because the cloud subscriptions that you are then forced to pay generates a steady stream of income for the manufacturer for years to come.The worst of the lot are camera that are absolutely crippled and cannot operate without an internet connection – these are the most dangerous because the whole point in having a security camera is that its going to be watching your home 24/7. Since many manufacturers still don’t have reliable cloud servers and an intruder can easily disable your internet connection, how can you be assured that your camera will notify you in time if a break-in is in progress? What you want is a camera that does not need any outside help to do its job – all it should need is electricity. I use a CyberPower UPS to provide backup power in case the burglars cut the power.
  • RTSP stream capable so that you can access the video stream from a 3rd part app such as tinyCam Monitor Pro or IP Cam Viewer. ONVIF support is ideal so that you can connect the camera to an NVR like Amcrest NVRs which can support any ONVIF compatible camera.

The nice-to-have features to consider are:

    • Wireless – While an Ethernet cable connection is more stable and hence more reliable, support for WiFi and/or Bluetooth is great if you have to install the camera in a spot you can’t run a data cable to. Please do not install only wireless cameras – make sure you have wired cameras also in case your wireless cameras fail for whatever reason.
    • Continuous Video Recording – Most indoor camera will have automatic event triggered recording, but not all support continuous video recording. Typically a Network Video Recorder (NVR) or NAS is needed for this function because recording 24/7 to as SD card will damage it easily. You can specify how many days worth of storage you want to keep, and the older videos will be automatically overwritten.
    • Audio – Most cameras that have a mic and speaker built-in are not full-duplex – they are half-duplex meaning you cannot carry on a conversation in a natural way, you will have to adopt a walkie-talkie style of talking over the camera. So look for full-duplex capability.
    • Software features – Email alerts on motion detection, audio detection, echo cancellation and push notifications to smartphone apps.
    • Local storage – I love using local storage such as an SD card as a secondary location for motion triggered clips. 100% cloud-reliant cameras will not have any local storage, but some cloud cameras like the Arlo Q Plus now feature local storage in case the Internet connection is unavailable. In my opinion, the best cameras are the ones whose cloud features are strictly optional and let you access their video stream using 3rd party apps like tinyCam Monitor Pro.
    • Motion detection method – While software based image change detection is the most common motion detection method, a PIR motion sensor is preferable to cut down on false alerts
    • Power source – A wired Ethernet port is preferable over wireless connections for the best reliability. PoE (Power over Ethernet) support is ideal since then you don’t need two cables to each camera. An internal battery for power backup purposes is great if a burglar cuts the power supply to disable your home defences.
    • Advanced features – Preferably a full API should be available for interfacing with home automation controllers such as the Vera Plus. IFTTT is not enough because it relies on an Internet connection and so is not a local solution.

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I am passionate about making it easy to get into DIY smart homes and security cameras!

2 Comments
  1. Excellent site – wish I knew about it before….I find myself with different wifi IP cameras with different “own dedicated” android apps. I tried to get them all together using the TinyCam PRO and IP Cam Viewer.

    Although both TinyCam and IP Cam Viewer are very good and can see the cameras there is one big negative. All the dedicated apps can run in the background and push an alert on motion and record the alert motion ( the Netcam app it nicely pushes the alert with a snapshot ).

    Unfortunately the TinyCam and IP Cam Viewer will not push an alert unless they are in the foreground – not good (unless I am doing something stupid. The Background Mode of tinycam is not good to me as it records at all time not just on alert).

    Now looking at your excellent reviews I have decided to replace all my cameras with your recommendations with a couple of internal and external cameras.

    Internal will be the Amcrest ProHD 1080p IP3M-941B and external the Reolink 4MP Super HD RLC-410W.

    Questions
    – can the Amcrest or Reolink android app used for both brands?
    – Would you recommend one brand only and if yes which one and models.

    Great site

    • Thanks for the kind words. It seems you are trying to get a 100% software solution that can do a physical NVR’s job – I am afraid you are going to be disappointed. The apps you mentioned are primarily designed for aggregating all your cameras in one place. Any NVR capabilities they tout are going to be very basic as you have discovered.

      For getting alerts from your cameras, there are two ways 1) set up each camera to send you alerts (not all cameras can do this), 2) get an NVR which can send you the motion alerts. Of course I recommend an NVR and see this article to learn more: https://www.vueville.com/home-security/cctv/nvr/best-diy-security-camera-system/#Which_DIY_route_-_Easy-DIY_or_Pro-DIY/

      >can the Amcrest or Reolink android app used for both brands?
      No

      >Would you recommend one brand only and if yes which one and models.
      The brands and models mentioned on this page are my picks out of the 100s out there.

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